An Italian-Canadian Christmas: Six recipes that you’ll find on my table this year

As I’m writing this, my two-year-old son is admiring the Christmas tree while incessantly turning on and off its’ lights. He’s giggling and it is a good break in the silence. I’m excited about for Christmas for my son – who is finally understanding the season – but this holiday will also be tougher than most. My dad will be missing from the festivities and, as is expected, some things will just have to change this year as we struggle on without him. Maybe we will start new traditions, maybe we will eventually go back to all the things we used to do with him…but one thing I’m noticing my family isn’t compromising on is the food. We still have to have the right Christmas food, my dad would be wondering what we were doing if we didn’t do at least dinner right.

So what does that mean? Well, usually a Christmas Eve full of seafood – fried shrimp, salted cod (bacala) and usually lobster too – and a Christmas day that starts with pasta and ends with a-few-too-many-desserts. I might not be able to give all my readers a brand new recipe post this year for Christmas (forgive me), but I can provide some of my past favourites. Here’s some typical Italian foods that will be on our table this coming holiday. What will be on yours?

CHRISTMAS EVE
Colluri (Also called: cullurielli, ciambelle, bomboloni, buffarede, grispelle)
The requests for these potato doughnuts start shortly after Halloween and continue on to sausage making season in the spring. When they are fresh out of the fryer, they are hot, fluffy and soak up tomato sauce like a sponge. If you make them a day ahead, you warm them up in the oven and it creates a super-crisp outer shell to these seasonal favourites. Here is the recipe.

Italian Potato Doughnut Recipe

Fritto Misto (fried mixed seafood)
I would protest any Christmas Eve without this. Firstly, yes Christmas Eve is all about seafood traditionally, but secondly deep-fried shrimp and calamari are one of my biggest treats. So quick to cook and perfect with a squeeze of lemon. This is a really simple recipe and totally better than calamari at a restaurant (never mind WAY cheaper). Here is the recipe.

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CHRISTMAS DAY
Pasta with Meatballs
Once we have had our fill of Christmas Eve seafood, Christmas Day brings out the heavy hitters. And in typical Italian fashion, yes, we start the meal with pasta. The sauce will have been simmering all day with various cuts of meat as well as meatballs and veal rolls. Here’s the truth though: you eat the pasta first and then fish the meat out of the sauce to enjoy it on it’s own (or with colluri – see above!). Here is the recipe.

meatball and braciole recipe

Rapini
The most common winter vegetables in Italian households, rapini is a bit bitter but is a great partner to other dishes that are so rich on the holidays. It’s really easy to prepare, a quick sautee with garlic and hot peppers, so it’s worth a try, at least once. Here is the recipe.

Rapini side dish recipe

 

DESSERTS
Honey Pinwheels (Also called cartellate or grispelle)
My kryptonite. Put these near me and all bets are off. Stop counting how many I’ve had because I will eat them all. Get them while they are fresh, because they won’t last long. And that’s all I’ll say about this recipe.

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Turdilli (Also called tordilli, turdiddri or turtiddi)
These are strange little “cookies” that are so unique to Southern Italy. From a dough that rises, these are fried and then dunked in honey. No two recipes are the same but if these are a tradition to you, you’ll recognize them instantly. We even have two recipes, one made with wine, another done “plain.”

basic turdilli recipe

By |18/12/2016|Mangia|0 Comments

“Promoting Italian food and culture in a Canadian way”: the 4th annual Pentola d’Oro Awards

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All photos by © Giulia Emanuela Storti

It’s been a while since I had the reason to dress up and celebrate. And this was a good reason. In November, the Italian Chamber of Commerce of Ontario hosted the fourth annual Pentola d’Oro Awards Gala in Toronto. I was so pleased to be an invited guest, this great event (for which I have previously sat on the judging committee) honours leaders in the Italian-Canadian food industry – now that is something I can get behind.

My family used to own a restaurant, and now in my full-time job I work in the food industry as well, so I am very familiar with the time, effort, dedication, and pure sweat it takes to make a business grow. And to stay true to your roots, and what you believe in, to maintain traditions and the integrity of good food along the way can be tough.

But those who were honoured did just that. Most importantly to me, they strive to share the beauty of Italian living through food. And while the food and mingling was amazing that night, what struck me the most was the messages from the awards recipients.

Domenic Primucci, president of Pizza Nova, was awarded the City of Vaughan Italy-Canada Award Primucci, and spoke about the importance of culture in both food and business. “We have a void in the living legacy of our culture… Canada allows everyone to celebrate our culture but we must check our egos at the door and collaborate.”

“Italian immigrants worked very hard and significantly impacted this country. We place a lot of importance on food. Love and laughter around the kitchen table it’s where we learn right and wrong and the hard work our parents did,” said Carmine Fortino, Executive Vice President & Ontario Division Head for Metro Ontario Inc. Fortino was awarded the Jan K. Overweel Ltd. Pentola d’Oro Award.

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Also, Rob Gentile, Chef at Buca Osteria & Enoteca was awarded the Pizza Nova Favourite Hotspot Award and eight Italian restaurants in Ontario were selected by the Italian Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Economic Development, Agriculture, Tourism, and Culture in collaboration with Unioncamere and ICCO to receive the Marchio Ospitalità Award. They were recognized for their dedication to Italian authenticity and meeting the highest standard in the industry.

The food was spectacular, the art was magical and the music from DIA was amazing. What stays with me long after these nights of awards though is the desire to strive to do better personally in living and preserving my culture. As Fortino noted, we all must “promote Italian food and culture in a Canadian way.” That’s something to be honoured.

Pentola d'Oro_Giulia Storti_MG_9249

By |08/12/2016|Culture|0 Comments

This year I lost my biggest fan

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My dad was this blog’s biggest fan. He read it religiously and phoned me to ask where the leftovers were of anything I made. If I hadn’t posted in a few weeks, he called to tell me people were expecting me to write and to get on it. He shared this blog with everyone he came across and told me to, no matter what, keep it up.

I lost my dad to complications of brain lesions (spread from what the doctors believe was a cancer they could never find) on September 9. So many events have happened in my life since I started the blog, but this one has the biggest impact.

My dad was one of my biggest supporters. No matter what recipe I tried, or what food I brought him he told me how good it was and easily ate it all. Weeks would have to pass before he could muster up any truth to me: “well, really, it needed more salt” or “no, Laura, that one wasn’t that great.” I can understand why he didn’t want to tell me anything critical since it often left me feeling as though I had let him down. My dad strived for the right thing, the right way, all the time.

Dad’s theory in life was that we can push through anything. It’s one of the lessons that will always stay with me. We all have the strength inside of us to keep pushing ourselves forward, to let fear and hesitation fall by the wayside, to make what we want to happen, happen. Dad did just that these last few months – he pushed hard to get through treatments and symptoms. He pushed us all to keep going no matter what doctors said or how he felt. So I need to keep going with this blog.

He was fiercely proud of being Italian, cherishing the language, the music, the culture and the food. In this last year he had become obsessed with righting a wrong from when he immigrated to Canada. Upon arrival, French nuns changed his name to Louis (not knowing how to spell or pronounce Luigi) and he had been given that name on all his identifications ever since. He hated it and spent hours on the phone trying to get his Italian name back. Recognizing and celebrating his heritage was, and is, important.

He taught anyone around him that family is everything. When my aunt’s kids were young, I remember him repeating to them constantly: “Who is your best friend? Your brother. Your sister. That’s your best friend.” And he meant it. He cherished having family all together, all the time. He never hesitated, not once, to help out anyone – whether it was to just fix something or to give advice. He spent hours fixing my house, tending to my newborn son and loving us however he could. He once spent three hours on the couch, with my newborn on his chest, letting us all get some sleep. He taught me in that moment what a father and grandfather, and for that matter a compassionate family man, really is. And he loved every minute of it. It is my favourite memory of dad. The memories and importance of family are why I need to keep going with this blog as well.

I know that I can never replace his presence and his love in our lives, but I can do my best to follow in the footsteps of a man who was strong, passionate, generous, driven and, in so many moments with family and friends, simply joyful. I will lead my family the same way Dad did. I hope that makes him proud. Dad, I love you. In his memory, I’ll be back to blogging shortly.

By |18/10/2016|Culture|9 Comments

Vegetable Tiella

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My grandfather used to sit out on his back patio, his legs stretched on a wobbly plastic chair, and “survey the land” (as I used to call it). After a long day working in his rather large backyard garden, there seemed to be nothing better than to enjoy the cool air of dusk, and the purple sky, while watching the garden shadows grow long.

And gardens do take a lot of work. Well, at least managing it the Italian way. We seed, prune and pluck, water diligently, tie and support, all to get the best out of our plants. My grandfather, and now me, never seemed to be the type of person to just “throw some seeds” and see what came.

And the result of all that work: a lot of vegetables. The first few tomatoes and peppers seem to come slowly and with great excitement surrounding their arrival. Then suddenly, sometime in August, it’s like the plants explode and the kitchen table is covered in vegetables and I’m scrambling to figure out what to do with them all. Here is one recipe that comes in handy during the summer bounty: tiella.

A traditional Southern Italian dish, tiella is a sort of baked casserole which, in some regions also includes mussels or some sort of seafood. In my family’s version though, vegetables are the star of the show. How else to best showcase all that hard work? Whether you just finishing picking in your own garden, or had a really successful shopping trip to the farmer’s market, break out your casserole dish and warm up the oven to have the best of summer all in one forkful.

tiella_vegetable_bake_recipe

Vegetable Tiella
4-5 medium tomatoes or 1 small can of plum tomatoes
1 eggplant
1 medium zucchini (or two small zucchini)
1 red or yellow onion
4 medium potatoes
8 ounces flat green or yellow beans
fresh parsley or basil
salt & pepper to taste
1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
2 tablespoons olive oil

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By |14/07/2016|Primo, Recipes|1 Comment

Piselli Fritti (Fried Peas)

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I’m about to offer you one of the simplest – and best – of all my family recipes. It’s peas. Fried peas.

This recipe is so simple, and so second nature to me, I’ve been consistently forgetting to include it on the blog. But this spring, with fresh peas around the corner, I stuck a sticky note on the fridge to make sure I remembered to write this recipe down.

Now there’s two ways you can end this recipe: by making the peas juicy and moist (which most Nonna’s prefer) or by crisping up the peas just slightly for some texture (which is what my sister and I always preferred – though my mom complained we were burning them!). How you want to end it is up to you, but they will both taste great. Fresh peas or frozen will work just fine.

Fried peas were a go-to recipe for my sister and I growing up. Other than my sister’s tried and true pasta she always – ALWAYS – made when she was looking after me. We paired the peas with chicken cutlets or chicken fingers, or steaks. This is actually the only way I eat peas, other than raw, straight out of the pod which is my absolute favourite spring treat. I’ve never boiled them or steamed them, that seems rather boring. Or mashed them, what’s up with mushy peas?

At the same time, I’m aware some people might think – why fry peas? I’ll tell you why: flavour. Layered Italian flavours. Try them just once, and you’ll need to have them again. To this day, if fried peas are served at any family gathering, I always take the leftovers.

Piselli Fritti
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped onions
2 cups fresh or frozen peas
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried basil
2 garlic cloves, minced or 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder
1/4 cup water or chicken stock (1/2 cup if you’d like the peas a little wetter)

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By |15/06/2016|Contorno (sides and snacks), Recipes|0 Comments

Celebrate 2016 Italian Heritage Month with me!

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It’s Italian Heritage Month!

Oh the events to go to!! You’ll taste, see, dance, and celebrate all things Italian this month (it should be hard to miss). Just last week I was able to attend Castello Italia at Casa Loma in Toronto, which featured Italian blown glass artists, singers, food, musicians and so much more. It was a great way to kick off the month.

And many will take the month to extole the virtues of Italian food, but also poetry, art, architecture, music, cars, innovation, fashion…and the list goes on.

I’ve done a lot of reflecting on the blog and what it means to me this year, 5 years after it’s start, and one thing that always weighs on my mind is how much it turned in to just a food blog. I used to write more about what Italian-Canadian life was like: the traditions, values, and rituals that make us what we are and, of course, the food. At first I wanted to sure not to focus just on food, to reduce “Italian-ness” to just that. But overwhelmingly, my readers told me, it was the food they really fell for. There seems to be no better way to be immersed into another culture, or reminded of your one, then feeding your senses of sight, smell and taste all at the same time.

shutterstock_100597609_01Over the past 5 years I’ve also had the privilege of working with a variety of Italia-Canadian businesses and entrepreneurs – newspapers and magazines, radio stations, food distributers, food retailers, museums and art galleries, national organizations, students and writers. I’ve gone dot events and seen Italian-Canadian celebrations of all things Italian (and Canadian) and talked to all kinds of people, of Italian-descent or otherwise, about what they love, and they speak passionately of it, about Italy and its’ people.

And going back to that list of Italian things to celebrate – cars, music, fashion, food and more – one thing becomes clear. It’s passion that sees each one of those Italian things through. Passion for speed and beauty brings us beautiful cars. Passion for simplicity, style and elegance brings us Italian fashion. Passion for family, flavours and nature brings us Italian food. We’re a people that don’t do things half-way. If we have the passion for it, we’re making it the best it can be.

So, it’s the same with this blog. Be it posts about being Italian or the best recipes I have from my family, it will be the best expression of Italian-ness that I can have. With all the passion I have.

Happy Italian Heritage Month everyone. Take the time to enjoy the blog, but also all the events happening across the country and online.

By |08/06/2016|Culture|0 Comments
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